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Ecclesiastes 1:18


Because in much wisdom there is much grief, and increasing knowledge {results in} increasing pain.



- New American Standard Version

 

Other Translations of Ecclesiastes 1:18

For in much wisdom is much grief; and he that increaseth knowledge increaseth sorrow.
- American Standard Version (1901)

For in much wisdom [is] much grief: and he that increaseth knowledge increaseth sorrow.
- King James Authorized Version (1769)

For in much wisedome is much griefe: and hee that increaseth knowledge, increaseth sorrow.
- King James Version (1611)

Because in much wisdom is much grief, and increase of knowledge is increase of sorrow.
- Basic English Bible

Because in much wisdom is much grief, and increase of knowledge is increase of sorrow.
- Darby Bible

Because In much wisdom there is much indignation: and he that addeth knowledge, addeth also labour.
- Douay Rheims Bible

For in much wisdom is much grief: and he that increaseth knowledge increaseth sorrow.
- Webster's Bible

For in much wisdom is much grief; and he who increases knowledge increases sorrow.
- World English Bible

for, in abundance of wisdom [is] abundance of sadness, and he who addeth knowledge addeth pain.'
- Youngs Literal Bible

For in much wisdom is much vexation; and he that increaseth knowledge increaseth sorrow.

- Jewish Publication Society Bible

 

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< Read the whole chapter of Ecclesiastes 1

 


View Wesley's Notes for Ecclesiastes 1:18

1:18 Grief - Or, displeasure within himself, and against his present condition. Sorrow - Which he does many ways, because he gets his knowledge with hard and wearisome labour, both of mind and body, with the consumption of his spirits, and shortening of his life; because he is often deceived with knowledge falsely so called, and often mistakes error for truth, and is perplexed with manifold doubts, from which ignorant men are wholly free; because he hath the clearer prospect into, and quicker sense of his own ignorance, and infirmities, and disorders, and withal how vain and ineffectual all his knowledge is for the prevention or removal of them; and because his knowledge is very imperfect and unsatisfying, yet increasing his thirst after more knowledge; lastly, because his knowledge quickly fades and dies with him, and then leaves him in no better, and possibly in a much worse condition than the meanest and most unlearned man in the world.